Book Review: An Artist of the Floating World

This is a rich study of an artist. As with other Kazuo Ishiguro novels, the narrator is unreliable. The action here is in trying to figure out what the narrator believes, what’s artifice, and so how far he is lying to us and himself in the presentation of his thoughts.

This was enjoyable for me because even though the artist–a Japanese painter who served as a propagandist for World War II–technically claims that what he did was morally wrong, you feel that he cannot quite accept that. He is a stubborn, proud man. At the end, the narrator reflects tranquilly on the path his life has taken, like Mr. Stevens at the end of Remains of the Day, but here this is sinister.

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“Fisherman” by Yamamoto Kanae 1904

Without fully owning up to what he did, and the consequences of what he did, as well as being cast off by a progressing society that would rather pretend those years didn’t exist, his summing up and self-satisfaction represents an revocation of responsibility. It is an revocation of responsibility, demanded by the rhythms of life, that allows for the sins of the past to be conveniently forgotten.

Book Review: 8.5/10: Ishiguro’s historical novel: Is a man a player in history or does history play him?

Here’s a good piece on the aesthetics in the book and how it is when the artist becomes political does his art degrade: https://johnpistelli.com/2014/06/17/an-artist-of-the-floating-world-kazuo-ishiguros-aestheticism/

 

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